image editing

This IS What It Looks Like.

Over the past couple months, we've been talking a lot about beauty internally. We've brainstormed about ways to talk about it. We've posted a two graphic collages on beauty, prepared by our interns Langsi and Preeya.  We've talked about hosting regular Google Hangouts where we talk about different aspects of beauty, confidence, and reality. We've even been making a short film on out thinking process. At first we were preoccupied with bullying. Were there other factors that made women particularly susceptible to bullying?

This is when we started looking at image editing.

One morning Sam and I took an hour to write an essay and submitted it; it was turned down flat with no explanation. We worked on it again and submitted it to another site. The editor almost immediately got back to us with some suggestions. After a weekend of contemplation, we resubmitted it a third time. After some editorial magic, the piece was published. We are thrilled that our thoughts are being shared, but saddened that this topic even needs airing. 

The impacts of role models are significant, be they positive or negative. We want you to know that excessive image editing sends the message that being unique is not beautiful. We think the media would be better served using it's "stage" as a role model to encourage our youth to believe they are beautiful and to love themselves, exactly as they are. 

This is what acceptance looks like. And here is the link to our published work. Thank you Vikram. 

http://www.businessoffashion.com/2014/06/op-ed-photoshopped-fashion-ads-labelled.html?utm_source=Subscribers&utm_campaign=8caab5ec00-&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_d2191372b3-8caab5ec00-417191305

Sam and Camilla