Move Over Hamilton

                                                 Photo courtesy of americanblog.com

                                                 Photo courtesy of americanblog.com

Recently the U.S. Treasury Secretary Jack Lew announced that the 2020 redesigned $10 bill will no longer be Alexander Hamilton, but a woman. Who you might ask? That decision has yet to be made, but surprisingly this is not the first woman ever to be featured on U.S. currency. That honor belongs to Martha Washington. Her visage was emblazoned on the $1 silver certificate from 1891 to 1896. According to the United States Mint, women have had slightly better representation on coins. Helen Keller, Sacagawea and Susan B. Anthony have all appeared on various circulating coins. 

The purpose is to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Amendment 19, which gave women the right to vote and a major first stepping stone to gender equality. Perhaps not as surprisingly, the Secretary is reaching out to the public to help make this important decision, just add #TheNew10 at the end of your tweet and cast your vote. The guidelines are simple, it must be someone who represents American democracy and legally, must be someone no longer living. 

Our votes go to Susan B. Anthony, Eleanor Roosevelt, or Rosa Parks. Weigh in with us on twitter using #Camillas10 and we’ll repost your tweet to our live feed! 

 

Camilla Olson

po box 414, palo alto, ca 94302-0414, usa

Camilla Olson designs for the modern professional woman. Camilla Olson worked her way through college at the U of MD Medical School, shifting to industry for 8 years post graduate. Once learning about Wall Street she invested as a VC for 4 years and then made her move to the entrepreneur side of the table, on the founding team of 5 companies, Later she earned her MFA, Fashion & Textile Design from Academy of Art Univ, cum laude. Honors include: designs on the NY Fashion Week Runway; Alumna of the Yr, Best Reinvention, Born: Fairbanks Alaska. B.S. microbiology University of Maryland MBA marketing Fairleigh Dickinson University. Awarded two U.S. patents. MFA fashion & textile design, Academy of Art University